Boston Marathon Will Not Occur in the Spring

The Hopkinton Common deserted during the fall. During the Boston Marathon, the common is filled with stations to purchase merchandise and food. This is also where spectators can watch the waves of runners take their first strides.

The Hopkinton Common deserted during the fall. During the Boston Marathon, the common is filled with stations to purchase merchandise and food. This is also where spectators can watch the waves of runners take their first strides.

The Boston Athletic Association announced that the Boston Marathon, traditionally held on the third Monday of April, will not take place until at least Fall of 2021. 

Massachusetts has yet to enter stage four of reopening, which is the only stage that allows road races and other large outdoor athletic events to take place.

This is the first time in history that the Boston Marathon, an event dating back to 1897, has been canceled entirely. Even during World War I, the event was changed to a ten-man military relay race.

For the 2020 Boston Marathon, the BAA held a ten-day virtual event in place of the in-person race. 

Like many associations and companies amid the coronavirus pandemic, the BAA’s priority is the “safety of participants, volunteers, spectators, and community members,” the CEO of BAA, Tom Grilk, said.

The BAA is working closely with local officials and the state’s coronavirus advisory group to move forward and determine the conditions where an in-person marathon can take place. 

The BAA seeks to announce a date by the end of the year, along with details on when to register, regulations, guidelines, size, and other details. 

This degree of uncertainty has definitely taken a toll on the city and all of the people involved, including runners, volunteers, and spectators.

The Boston Marathon Start line remains untouched. It is traditionally repainted every year, as it fades throughout the winter. However, this will not happen this year.

“The Marathon is one of Boston’s most beloved traditions,” the Mayor of Boston, Marty Walsh, said, “We look forward to holding the Marathon again to celebrate not only this world-class event but also the resilience and solidarity that the people of Boston have shown throughout this crisis.”

The Boston Marathon is one of the six major marathons in the world, along with the Berlin, London, Chicago, Tokyo, and New York City marathons.

Among these six, only two held road races this year and they were only available to elite-level athletes.

A long-time marathon runner and Hopkinton resident, Amy Coffone, has been disappointed.

“It’s definitely strange. I’ve become so used to the yearly routine and it’s sad to see fewer runners out there training. I’m hopeful though,” Coffone said.

Coffone is not the only hopeful one. The BAA is hopeful as well, and working hard to make sure an in-person race can occur in Fall 2021.

“We are optimistic that the Boston Marathon will continue its tradition of celebrating the spirit of community and athletic excellence next fall. We know there will be many questions and we will look to address them in the coming months ahead,” Grilk said.

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